This is a very touching piece. I can kind of relate to it, as I have also kind of been there.

My mom had a stroke, at 58. This absolutely changed who she had been. She had been an extremely competent, extremely sharp, quick thinking judge.

But she lost all that, and became an impulsive irrational 3-year old, a manipulative 10-years old, and yet often times was very much still a wise 58 year old woman.

Because I had pieces of the old mom, who would pop out sporadically, it wasn't a total loss.

But having to deal with that 3 year old and 10 year old was miserable.

I was at a stroke conference, learning about strokes, when the speaker there made it clear that the changes were probably going to be permanant.

I cried. I felt so much grief in that moment. I just wanted my old mom back. The sad thing was, she just wanted her old self back too.

Looking back on it, I wasn't as patient with her as I should have been.

At at the time, I was only in my late 30's- but the oldest of 5, so dealing with this primarily fell all on me.

My mom was lucky. She recovered very well...and now she spends a good deal of time being a wise 72 year old.

But your mom, bless her heart. I so feel for her. She's very perceptive. Being in the hospital IS a lot like being in jail. She wants out and I so understand. I have been there and done that, as has my mom. (She did NOT want to stay for t he month long rehab at one of the best brain injury facilities in the country. My mom wanted out, and me and the manipulative 10 year old fought about that.)

But being hospitalized is a very humbling experience. None of us seemed to care for the experience much. We are all far too independent for that bs.

Sigh...you have my hopes and prayers as well, for whatever they are worth.

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